FEED ME: Choosing the last supper

By on January 13, 2015
Rendezvous Bistro’s jambalaya includes venison chaurice and New Caledonian shrimp. A spicy dish with smoked poblanos. PHOTO: GERALDINE MISHEV

Rendezvous Bistro’s jambalaya includes venison chaurice and New Caledonian shrimp. A spicy dish with smoked poblanos. PHOTO: GERALDINE MISHEV

Jackson Hole, Wyoming – It’s a question that sometimes comes up as a hypothetical: if you could plan it, what would be your last meal?

Yes, I’m being slightly overdramatic here, but with several months of chemo treatment in my future, I looked at dinner the night before my first treatment as my last supper for a few months. Chemo, for those who haven’t had the pleasure, makes most everything you eat taste either metallic and/or like cardboard. And, to make eating even more fun, there’s sometimes an accompanying nausea that lets you taste everything again as it makes its way back up. Fun times. I’ve even heard that you don’t need to actually be eating anything to taste the wonderful flavors of metal and cardboard.

I had about a week’s notice to plan my last supper, and I spent that week mentally going through the candidates. Staying at home and cooking dinner was not an option. My family is not one of chefs. (Although I did briefly consider a last meal of a batch of cookie dough, which I do excel at making. Ultimately though, I decided that would not be the best way to support my body as it embarks on this latest adventure.)

I wanted something that my parents and my boyfriend would like, but, of course, this was a circumstance where I didn’t feel badly making myself priority No.1. So really it had to be a place I loved.

It didn’t take long to simplify the candidates: Snake River Grill or Rendezvous Bistro.

Because I was feeling greedy, I decided to do both: a romantic almost-last supper with my boyfriend at the Grill and then the true last supper with the family at the Bistro.

Despite being amazingly busy and my request coming at the last-minute, I was grateful the Grill managed to squeeze us in, and at my favorite table in the bar, nonetheless. But the table was pretty much the highlight of the meal.

Because I was trying to be kind to my body, I didn’t order alcohol; because he didn’t feel like drinking, neither did my boyfriend. We felt that decision immediately relegated us to second-class diners, a feeling I have gotten before at the Grill when I’ve opted not to drink.

We then created a meal out of a number of shared plates and appetizers, which I always prefer to the Grill’s entrees. The new Brussels sprouts preparation is delicious.

Even after our server offered us a dessert on the house to make up for the fact we didn’t get our first bite of food until an hour after sitting down, there was nothing on the dessert menu that called to us. I put my puffy pants back on and we walked home, disappointed.

Beef bourguignon, also care of the Bistro, pairs perfectly with the carrot-cardamom mashed potatoes. PHOTO: GERALDINE MISHEV

Beef bourguignon, also care of the Bistro, pairs perfectly with the carrot-cardamom mashed potatoes. PHOTO: GERALDINE MISHEV

But my true last supper at the Bistro more than made up for it. I had always thought I would cry if the restaurant ever took the pork adobo, my long-standing favorite entrée, off the menu. It turns out that instead I happily ordered sea bass, ate a significant portion of my boyfriend’s slice of meatloaf, had many tastes of my mom’s beef bourguignon, and stole some bites from my dad’s jambalaya. If it’s a last meal, you’ve gotta go big. Especially when each entrée was better than the last.

The four of us all traded bites, and we were all in agreement there was no favorite. The Bistro killed it across the board. Falling asleep that night though, it was the beef borguignon, something I’d never order myself, I dreamt about.

The entrees came after a charcuterie plate, which included duck prosciutto, garlic sausage, grappa-seared salmon, chicken liver and foie gras mouse, and some kind of heavenly preparation of venison.

There might also have been a warm-up platter of a pink peppercorn-crusted prosciutto. I could eat this for the rest of my life and be very, very happy.

You’d think that after all of this, there would be no room for dessert. But we soldiered on.

Hands down, right now, for my personal dessert preferences (well-crafted classics), the Bistro has the best dessert menu in town. Between the four of us we had lemon crème brulee, red velvet cheesecake, and peanut butter pie. Again, I could not decide on a favorite.

Last supper or not, the Bistro is the best restaurant in the valley right now.

Rendezvous Bistro, 380 U.S. 89. Reservations recommended, 739-1100; rendezvousbistro.net


About Geraldine Mishev

2 Comments

  1. Dallas hofman

    January 21, 2015 at 2:10 pm

    You don’t know what your talking about! You should not be able to write where people can read your crap shit. You would no a good meal if it hit you in the face, I’m sure you eat every other meal at McDonald’s shut the hell up and don’t write about shit you don’t know. Are you a food critic you sound like a retaded hick.

  2. George

    March 18, 2015 at 12:15 pm

    Does your waiter give you a funny grin/ reaction when you say no alcohol tonight? Restaurant managers should train these $50/ hour laborers not to be gready alcohol sales proffesionals!

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