ELECTION 2014: Candidates for county commissioners

By on October 29, 2014

BEN ELLIS

benellis

What does the county do well?

With the programs we have in place, they’re incredibly efficient. We delivered the services that we agreed to deliver, from Parks and Rec to library to development of new roads and maintenance of existing roads.

We’ve got a really great work environment as well. The staff seems generally pleased to be working there. There are 300 or so employees on our payroll and it’s a good working environment. It’s collaborative, it’s problem solving. Another thing the county commission has done recently is development of a new strategic mission at a higher level than it’s been done in the past. I think that gives good guidance for staff as well.

Where can the county improve?

The challenge that our board faces is figuring out how to make strategic long-term investments in the community because obviously funds are limited. We have no real interest in raising revenue and/or taxes, so you have to be very efficient and strategic. And we have some very big problems that the community is facing. It’s been hard for the board to be efficient about how we make those investments. For example: We haven’t done a good job of developing our employee housing program. We have senior and mid-level and emergency services employees that are struggling to find housing, like every other business or government entity in Teton County. We have the resources and we’ve made a commitment to developing housing but we haven’t been able to put that program into place.

Part of it is differences on the board. I brought forward the idea of buying a five-acre parcel that’s commercial in town and developing it using a revenue bond that would be paid for by the rents from that property. We would build housing, rent it to our employees and the rent would pay for the bond. It would actually have no negative impact to our balance sheet. It’s essentially a revenue-neutral investment in the community. But it was just much too big for the other commissioners to think about or get their heads around. So there’s an example where we know we have a problem. We all agree on what the problem is. But the approaches are very, very different. Paul Vogelheim, for example, was specifically against using any debt. Like that was his litmus test. He won’t even have a conversation about using debt. Whereas I see it as a strategic, efficient use of very low interest rate money. Much lower interest rate than the public could get. If we can borrow money at 2 percent? I wish I could do that for my own personal mortgage, you know?

What is the county’s role in alleviating the inadequate inventory of workforce housing?

My favorite subject. It was interesting during the Shift event to meet with the mayor of Aspen. They have 30 percent of their housing stock in some way deed restricted or for employees. And they’re shooting for a higher number. But they don’t have a housing crisis. They didn’t have one this summer. They have a perpetual housing problem that they’re working on. The reason that they are able to get such high levels of investment with public money in housing assets is through a dedicated revenue stream. Every community that’s been able to solve this problem has to figure out how to get a dedicated revenue stream.

The past model where somebody comes up with a parcel that seems like it might fit for housing and then goes around and gets public entities to potentially buy it up, and then another entity builds it and hopes that the revenue associated with building it can be recaptured when the units are sold – that’s just gone. The values of land are too high. We can’t make that pencil out. We are at 10 percent now. I think it would be great if we could get to 30 percent restricted housing in some way. Because I don’t see the private sector ever coming back into a range where they could be affordable and I don’t see us ever going to be able to build out at a high enough level to change the market characteristics.

So what does that mean? That means revenue. What I’d like to do is put before the voters the potential of a half-cent of sales tax that would be earmarked for housing. Leave it to the voters. This is such an important community issue. It affects businesses and it affects residents. And we have this tool, which is putting this kind of question in front of voters to see if they want to self-tax. If they don’t, I think it’s a reflection of a combination of things. It’s a reflection of [the voters saying], “You know what? It’s not as big of an issue as you think it is and the private sector should really be dealing with it at a higher level than they are.” Then government’s role is going to be limited to the way we’ve done it in the past. That’s voting no. If the voters vote yes, it’s a seed change – a fundamental shift in the way that we’ve dealt with housing in the past. It could generate about $5 million a year and it’s a steady revenue source which would allow for investment in a range of housing types that can start filling in the gap from the smallest rentals all the way up to a house that really could be confused with a market house but the public owns it in some way so it’s restricted in its escalation so it stays in an affordable pool forever.

Is the planning process too arduous and costly? Can it be streamlined for the little guy while staying robust enough to mitigate the impact of large developments?

I agree that it is a cumbersome process. I’ve built numerous houses – about 30 in the valley and most of those affordable. I also built two of my own houses. And it’s challenging. I had a general contractor’s license. I’m comfortable reading the regulations and working through that process. To me, it seems like for the most part it is designed as a checks and balances to protect the welfare and safety of the people that are living in those houses. We live in a very high seismic area. We have very heavy snow loads.

I do think there are some ways to streamline the process but I also think it’s important to have these protections. We have a sophisticated set of values we are trying to protect and there is no easy “delete the building code” kind of approach. People have been working on simplifying it for years including our own planning staff and I’ve been very supportive of those efforts. Is it ever going to be like buying a cup of coffee at JH Roasters? No. It’s never going to be easy. It’s always going to be a challenge and I think that’s OK. There are certainly some regulations that seem silly. People that had a historical deck that’s in an easement, you know, we put them through hell to redo their deck. Silly things like that need to change.

Your inspiration for running?

I was a planning commissioner for a number of years before and I really enjoyed that work. Planning is a great inroad into a certain portion of what county is doing from a long-range planning perspective. At the time there was some regulations on the books that the board was pushing for that I fundamentally disagreed with. I decided then it was time, from an issues perspective.

get up and stand up and see if I could get elected. The tool at the time was the family subdivision. I felt like it was undermining the most important parts of our community values. Other issues like growth and traffic … some parts of our community have 3 percent growth a year in traffic – like Wilson, South Park Loop and the Y. That’s unsustainable. I think government has an important role in solving those and I’ve been working on those essentially since I became a commissioner.

MARK NEWCOMB

Mark-Newcomb-CtyCommish

What does the county do well?

We’ve got a good core infrastructure started. We’ve got START Bus that’s been increasing. That multimodal vision, we’ve got the foundation for that. We do have our 1,400 units of restricted housing. We’ve got this framework. Honestly, I feel like all the commissioners right now are sharp. With the kind of pressures we face you are just not going to be on the right side of the issues all the time. Some of the incumbents have rubbed people the wrong way and I don’t know whether it was they decided against their point of view, or they appeared to have little interest in listening, but that felt like a personal thing. By and large it feels like they’ve been a good commission and they’ve been relatively productive having looked back on some of the commissions we used to have.

Where can the county improve?

I’m not sure that they’re quite grasping the pressure we will be under to grow. That’s really the point of my campaign. That’s a pretty broad statement but that’s going to mean doing the hard work up front and shifting gears again. Every new Comprehensive Plan was a shift in gears. People have been saying everything we are doing right now is not much different than the ’94 Plan. We’ve got to be a little more determined than that. We’ve got to be pushing for something different to happen because the trajectory of that ’94 Plan is just not going to get us on target toward our goals of doing the best we can to protect the environment and continuing with our multimodal transportation.

And the pressure to house workers is going to be intense. We’re shooting for 65 percent. Most people in the know say that’s impossible. There is not a lot the county can do if we allow no more than one [unit] per 35 [acres]. If town slips and allows more commercial than they need to, we are not going to house 65 percent. We are just walking a thin line and I’m not sure the commission right now gets it.

What is the county’s role in alleviating the inadequate inventory of workforce housing?

We’ve got some good pieces in place. Broadly speaking, one of the things I think could be done better is more coordination between our three housing entities and the town and county. That might take a central coordinating position. The funding would have to be worked out.

We do have a few character districts in town that are transitional. We might be able to increase the bulk and scale of what’s there for housing. That’s a town issue. For farther down the road, High School Road actually has a segment of green space that’s considered a potential for housing. We can start thinking now about the bulk and scale we could be using there without throwing any surprises at the community, and also to get ahead of it and not let it be developer-driven.

Is the planning process too arduous and costly? Can it be streamlined for the little guy while staying robust enough to mitigate the impact of large developments?

There is something that can be done. I’m not going to say that can be done at all levels. I think the little guys, if they are just adding a bedroom, they don’t need to be paying some of these exactions that they are charged with now. Getting into the details, I’m not sure how we can make the process move more quickly for them, though. The concept here should be a sliding scale. Once you get below a certain level of development, where it’s pretty clear you are not impacting things that much, let’s make it as easy as possible.

As far as the high end, I’m going to be upfront and say they are probably always going to have a bit of a hurdle to get over because they’re the ones that have the greatest potential for the greatest impact. That’s not to say we want to burden them and burden them and burden them. My goal is to set out some pretty clear guidelines upfront on bulk and scale so that they know what they can do within that.

Also, I think it’s always worth looking at our exaction fees and trying to figure out if they are matching our goals and if they are onerous in any way because they can always be tweaked.

Your inspiration for running?

It did definitely come from the role I’ve been playing with the Comprehensive Plan and an opportunity now to craft some things for the future. It’s a heck of a challenge and truly I’ve loved it. It’s a lot of time to put in as a volunteer and my wife has sacrificed a lot to help me with it.

PAUL PERRY

paulperry

What does the county do well?

They manage the budget well, number one. They also take care of our roads; snowplowing and all that. Fire/EMS is in great shape.

Where can the county improve?

Planning. It’s taking way too long. Some of this goes back to the LDRs. People have no idea [what to expect about the process]. “What are you going to do to me going forward?” [they are asking]. I’ve been there. This has been my overall theme forever. We are too overregulated in this county and it’s too hard to get through the process in a timely manner. When you spend months to go through the planning process and a ton of money and then you still don’t know what’s happening in the end. That’s my problem.

What is the county’s role in alleviating the inadequate inventory of workforce housing?

The biggest thing we can do is stop piling on regulations that are preventing people from building workforce housing. As we go through the LDR updates, we keep adding on regulations. I know numerous people right now that want to build housing but the regulations are such that it’s too hard. We need to look at exactions and mitigation fees. They are actually counterproductive to building workforce housing. They need to be reevaluated.

Is the planning process too arduous and costly? Can it be streamlined for the little guy while staying robust enough to mitigate the impact of large developments?

We have a set of LDRs. If you follow those you should be guaranteed a permit at the end. There are some people that follow the whole process and are still turned down. And they shouldn’t be. The whole process of 12 months just to get the entitlements, then apply for a building permit; that’s way too long. You’ve got people from large cities where they have a lot of stringent rules and even they can’t believe it takes that long in our community.

Your inspiration for running?

I’m a boots-on-the-ground guy. I see, every day, what’s going on in the county. Most people are at the 30,000-foot level. They’re theoretical, saying, “This is what we should aspire to …” Well, here’s what’s going on. I’m the only guy that owns and runs a business that knows how all these rules affect the little guy. I don’t believe the small business owner is being represented well. There’s no one looking out for him. My sister and others ask me, “Why would you want to go through that?” I say if good people don’t step forward then we’re never going to get good quality leadership. I’m fearful for what some of the regulations they are wanting to do will do to our business community.

REYNOLDS POMEROY

pomeroy

What does the county do well?

When you look at the complexity of the things they have to do, they’re providing services pretty well. They really are. I see it in the winter in particular. We get a huge storm and the streets are cleared, the county plows are out. Across the board they do pretty good work. And just coming out of the recession, they are doing it with a shorter staff. I’m pretty impressed.

Where can the county improve?

The Comp Plan and the LDRs. People are squawking about the timeline that’s taken. It’s hard to sort of parse it out on the county but I think people are disappointed in the timeline. Let’s get the job done and move along.

What is the county’s role in alleviating the inadequate inventory of workforce housing?

It’s an ongoing problem. We’ve been talking about it for decades. I said something at the Rotary forum the other day. We are all talking about solutions and it occurred to me if we are talking about a solution it sort of implies that the problem is static; that you can get from Point A to Point B. Well this is a very fluid situation. The community almost seemed to be caught off-guard by the fact that we are busy in the summer and have this housing shortage.

Over the course of the campaign I’ve heard people list all these tools that we have in the box to address the situation and it’s time that we really get together and apply those. Density is one of them. That’s a conversation that we’ve sort of shied away from. Zoning has a certain influence there as well of course. What revenue streams can we identify, establish and plug in and for how long to help fund things?

I wish there were solutions. I don’t think there is a solution other than to stay constantly vigilant and commit ourselves to making a difference. I’ve also pitched both private sector and community-wide, government has a role but so does the private sector. Ski Corp is a classic example of someone stepping up and making a difference.

Is the planning process too arduous and costly? Can it be streamlined for the little guy while staying robust enough to mitigate the impact of large developments?

We’ve got these competing values and interests here. They are always in tension. My impression is the county is understaffed to do certain things. Everybody gets excited about hiring more staff because that means a bigger budget but if it results in getting the work done more quickly and efficiently I think that’s a good thing. If it just adds layers of bureaucracy then not so good. I think there is a general appreciation now that we are ramping back up to a robust economy that some of the delays are more tied to overburdened process or to many regulations. I’ve heard it a lot lately. Just simple things like putting a deck on can be expensive and time-consuming and a hassle.

Your inspiration for running?

I was approached last winter. I’ve been approached on and off over the years to run. My background in the community in both public service and businessman’s standpoint registered on some people’s radar that I would be a good candidate. This time around the stars sort of aligned and I was in a position professionally and the kids are old enough and I got the blessing of my wife. At the time I wasn’t aware of how many candidates were going to run. By the time I registered and we ended up with nine candidates for three seats that was both inspirational and daunting. I was like, “Wow, this is going to be a tougher race.” We’ve got a great slate of candidates.

SCOTT ANDERSON

scottanderson

What does the county do well?

I think they’ve got a great customer service model over there. The staff and employees work hard to make sure citizens are treated well, treated like customers. I’ve seen that in every encounter I’ve had whether it’s getting my car renewed or getting a registration done or changing my party affiliation from Republican to Independent. All those have been pleasant experiences.

Where can the county improve?

I think, fundamentally, the County Commission is an organization that needs to be remade into something that’s more efficient. It needs to run smoothly through a chain of command, through a flowchart. In order to make decisions efficiently, you’ve got to have an organization that runs efficiently. One of my major concerns about the county is they don’t run efficiently as an organization.

Micromanagement is one of the worst things that happen inside any organization. When a commissioner, as an example, takes a peculiar overriding interest in the work output of individual employees, staff members or departments, it’s really done in a way that is an overall damaging practice. I look at the staff of the county, what’s left of it anyway, and I see professionals that have the appropriate education, that understand what their job is and know how to do it, and my view is we need to let them do their work and we need to sit back and focus on what the policy is that we want to project to county. The policy is what guides the departments to do what the community wants.

What is the county’s role in alleviating the inadequate inventory of workforce housing?

The first thing I would pursue if elected to the county commission would be to go out and purchase a piece of land and build a couple of apartment buildings. The reason I think that’s important is it underscores a commitment to something that everyone seems to agree is the biggest problem in the community. And if that’s true, there should be broad support for doing that and building these units, and it puts housing on the ground immediately.

The next thing I would do is step back and take a look at how we view the different product types of workforce housing, deed restricted housing. By that I mean we’ve focused a lot on ownership, which was an admirable thing to do. The idea was to trampoline somebody out of an affordable housing into the market. The prices of property make that pretty hard to do for most people. So I think what we should do is take a look at more of a long-term lease agreement more so than ownership to give people security that at least they have a place to live. And to do this with some kind of a subsidized rent amount – in other words not charge the market rent – and encourage them to bank the savings into what would hopefully become a down payment for them at some point. It would also create a revenue stream for the housing agencies that would allow them to have their own guaranteed revenue stream over a long period of time. It would allow them to build a unit that they know, at least at some point, is going to get used over again. To me, that’s a different approach to what we have been doing.

The last thing I would do is I would take a hard look at mitigation rates in the town of Jackson. I obviously, as county commissioner, can’t tell the town what to do but I would encourage them to look at mitigation rates as a rule that probably get in the way of redevelopment. So if you are looking for some kind of market-based sliver of a solution here I think you’ve got to look at what stops people from developing property in town.

Is the planning process too arduous and costly? Can it be streamlined for the little guy while staying robust enough to mitigate the impact of large developments?

What people really want is certainty. They want to know what the rules are. That’s all. And right now we are playing under a set of rules that are in conflict with the new Comp Plan in many ways. What I want people to understand that until we actually get this stuff on the books we are kind of in no man’s land. To me, the process has taken far too long. By the time, if you follow some people’s timeline where they say the LDRs could take another couple years, we’re closing in on a decade worth of work on a plan that you wonder whether it might not be obsolete by the time we get it adopted.

Your inspiration for running?

I don’t like what I see when I look at the county commission. I like everybody up there, personally, very much. But the organization needs to operate at a level we can all understand. My experience with the town gave me a really good look at how a sophisticated governmental organization should run. The town is very well managed. I recognize there are differences in the way the county is staffed. That being said I don’t think it’s a good idea to not have a permanent county administrator. I think it’s better to have that person in place and to create a flow chart of how we are going to communicate our goals for policy. Just like Bob McLaurin does it for the town, the county needs to find someone to do it over there.

The second thing is we’ve got to take a look at the employees of the county and understand that they do a good job. They work hard. But they deserve the guidance of a group that understands, as an example, that giving themselves a 30 percent-plus pay increase while they give the staff a much smaller pay increase just doesn’t lead to a great company feeling. I know I wouldn’t feel very good about it. We’ve got to recognize and empower the employees.

PAUL VOGELHEIM

PaulVogelheim-CountyComm

What does the county do well?

The HR department is operating really well. We are starting to take a look at the second biggest cost we have in terms of health care insurance, and we are getting a good handle on that. The various department heads have really stepped up in the void without an administrative manager.

Continued efforts as far as adjudication, which is a big part of our job: ruling on Housing Authority challenges or land use issues. This board functions really well in that arena too.

Where can the county improve?

Having clear timelines established. Establishing priorities. Look at the Land Development Regulations. What are our priorities on tackling the most critical elements of the LDRs? How are we going to go about doing that? What are the timelines associated with that? Once we start getting into discussions about timelines and maybe find out, “Wow, that’s going to take a year to get to?” We can ask ourselves what other resources can we allocate or bring in to shorten that timeline?

Making sure that we are tracking on a very high level. That starts with performance reviews and seeing those through. It’s been a bit of an evolution right now in terms of bringing back the importance of annual performance reviews, which is part of our policy. But it’s something we had not been subscribing to.

What is the county’s role in alleviating the inadequate inventory of workforce housing?

It’s a three-prong approach for me. One, is we continue to have a role with the public effort. With the current Housing Authority but it would be great to have a more collaborative effort on managing that. It would be great to have town and county under joint oversight. Whether that’s a joint Housing Authority or a joint department, I don’t know what the best thing there would be. There also needs to be greater collaboration with, particularly, the Housing Trust. When you look at the Authority’s overhead costs of $600,000 a year, that’s probably being duplicated over at the Trust and you have to question whether that money could be better spent moving towards a solution.

The important thing about workforce housing, when you take a look out there right now, 90 percent of workforce housing is in the private sector. The private sector is really the area I see as having the most efficient and quickest way to respond to the needs we have right now.

The third one is how do we continue to encourage the employers in this community to come up with solutions for their employees? I think there is an awakening going on right now in terms of, “Wow, I have a worker shortage but I can alleviate that if I had employee housing.” There’s a great example of that down at the Powderhorn Mall by KMart where Jackson Hole Mountain Resort is building 92 units.

Is the planning process too arduous and costly? Can it be streamlined for the little guy while staying robust enough to mitigate the impact of large developments?

Hopefully, it’s not the commission that is the constraint on these things. The goal in the Comprehensive Plan was to provide clarity in our Land Development Regulations so that it’s not subject to subjective rulings by the commission. We are trying to get away from Conditional Use Permits. We are trying to provide that clarity in the new LDRs but that means we’ve got to get the LDRs done. I see this as a big solution for our workforce housing right now. If we provide clarity with our LDRs that will unleash the private sector to go out and build apartments and that’s the big shortage we have right now in our community.

As far as smaller issues like decks and permitting and those types of things, we continue to change the culture in the planning department. They’ve become much more customer-friendly and much more responsive. We are staffing up again. The planning department took the biggest cuts in the county of any departments – a 50 percent cut – during the slowdown, and that was appropriate because of the downturn in applications and everything else. Now we’re ramping back up again responding to the growth in the construction trade.

Your inspiration for running?

I was driving down the road with my dad. I was visiting with him in California. I got a call from the Republican Party. They said, “Bill Paddleford passed away. Would you consider?” I said I would and hung up the phone. I said, “What do you think, Dad? This is kind of crazy to be giving up a good career and some other stuff.” He said, “Life’s all about service. That’s the only thing that’s important.” I said, “Dad, you were a corporate guy. You worked for National Cash Register for all those years.” He said, “Yeah, that was just providing for the family. Once I was done providing for the family I shifted everything to service.” That left a big impression on me and helped me decide I was going to throw my hat in the ring. There were 13 of us and I ended up being the one selected. That was in 2008.

SMOKEY RHEA

Smokey Rhea

Smokey Rhea

What does the county do well?

Actually I think most things are being done well.

Where can the county improve?

I do think we sort of lost our balance. I think that is starting to show up in workforce service demand going up but the housing going down. It didn’t sneak up on people in social services but it definitely snuck up on the public as a whole. Everybody keeps saying to me, “How come all of the sudden overnight it’s a crisis?” Well, it didn’t happen overnight. We’ve been talking about it for a long time. But it only impacted a certain level of the community –the entry-level people. Until it started moving up the ladder and impacting business owners, it didn’t really get out into the community. Social services would know because people would be going into social services saying they were in crisis. They don’t go in and talk to their county commissioners. That’s a shame. They don’t feel like they have a voice. For the most part, if you go to the meetings when we had the short-term rental discussions, who was in the audience weren’t all the people I knew that had been displaced. Instead it was all the real estate agents who had a financially invested interest in the outcome.

Mark Barron kept saying to me, “There’s not one worker that has been displaced by the short-term rentals.” I was stunned. Because it was a huge number. But they don’t see it. Because what [Barron] was seeing was his friends and people he knew who needed to do short-term rentals in order to pay their mortgage, is what he said to me, and wouldn’t we want them to stay here? Yeah, I would, but at the same time we’ve got to have our workers be able to stay here too.

What is the county’s role in alleviating the inadequate inventory of workforce housing?

To me, that’s what’s been missing. There isn’t a voice from on-the-ground people. And I’ll go right on the tape to say this, but it’s a huge grind with me that everybody keeps saying I don’t have a business background. And it’s like, “OK, which is more important, is it the business that goes and helps set up tents from one end of the valley to the other?” Because that’s what I’m hearing with [Paul Perry] saying, “I’m all over the valley.” And he is working with people on a certain level. But he’s not working with the same people on my level. They’re not going to go to him and say, “I need you to help me with my wedding but oh, by the way, I can’t pay my medical bills or find a place to live.” So you feel like you have a pulse on the community because you are everywhere. But you don’t have your pulse on the community if you are not sitting down with them and hearing their hardships. That’s what my job was. It’s business as much as there is a business. I think it even goes more to having a business sense because when you have a nonprofit you really have to penny-pinch and look where your money is going.

Is the planning process too arduous and costly? Can it be streamlined for the little guy while staying robust enough to mitigate the impact of large developments?

I definitely think it’s too hard. But I think all those rules and restrictions got put in place quite a long time ago because they were trying to stop a lot of the sprawl. It hasn’t been effective. But no matter what happens there will be a certain group that will fight it. We’ve become such a litigious society where everything ends in suit.

I know, for instance, Clarene Law has talked about wanting to put up some workforce housing on some of the lots she owns around town but it’s not feasible for her to do that. There has to be give and take on both sides. It seems to me like we’ve turned the “C” words into “F” words. Compromise, collaboration; they are bad words now. It seems like you’ve got to be for this or you’ve got to be for that.

Your inspiration for running?

My whole thing in this campaign is defining what community character is. I really thought back over the years from when I was back here in ’67 for just one summer and when I moved here in ’82. I was fortunate enough to have some really good friends who really mentored me kind of early on and they were Jackson’s pioneers. And what they were always telling me was the story of their old days when they were taking care of each other. Everybody knew each other. They all pulled together. To me, why we are losing that is we are getting more people coming in who are part-time, and that doesn’t mean they don’t have something to offer the community, in fact I think they do, but as they and second homeowners come in there are less people who are ingrained in the community and know each other. If we are going to lose that character it’s because we are pushing out a huge section of that population, which is the middle class.

Study after study tells you when you have an island like we have where there is so little private land, that if you don’t have control over some of it, you are going to lose control over all of it. To me, we have focused so much on ownership of affordable housing we haven’t done enough to look at rentals. High-end condos have replaced so many of our available rentals. We haven’t been focusing on that entry-level worker.

We will always be a tourist-driven economy as long as we have the Tetons. We pride ourselves on having the No. 1 ski resort and we are a top-10 foodie town. How long can we keep that up if a majority of the people who live here are second homeowners? I’ve heard from 42 percent to 47 percent. But no matter which number it is, look how fast we’ve moved in that direction. And once we get over more than 50 percent of our population not living here and the land is so expensive, you know they’re going to look at short-term rentals.


About Jake Nichols

Jake is a work in progress.

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