CULTURE KLASH: Artsy Roundup

By on November 1, 2016

From the Video Blitz to printmaking bliss, don’t miss these events.

Walt Gerald hangs his first solo show at The Rose (left). Team Britain (top right) was among the inspired filmmakers of last year’s Video Blitz, which celebrates 10 years Friday, and artist Delsa Smith Allen’s fall leaves can be found in Pinedale this weekend.

Walt Gerald hangs his first solo show at The Rose (left). Team Britain (top right) was among the inspired filmmakers of last year’s Video Blitz, which celebrates 10 years Friday, and artist Delsa Smith Allen’s fall leaves can be found in Pinedale this weekend.

A Year in Print

JACKSON HOLE, WY – Join printmaker Walt Gerald for the opening of his solo show, “Forward Momentum,” at The Rose on Friday. Gerald has been busy in 2016 serving up his unique designs both commercially and in fine art realms. By day he is the graphic designer for Teton County Library. You’ve also likely seen his work on posters for the People’s Market, the Fireman’s Ball, and on the front cover of this newspaper’s primary election issue.

Gerald’s work blends the old fashioned with the contemporary. Using bold geometric shapes along with motifs from more flowery and antiquated texts, his prints are often humorous and always eye-catching. Originally from the South, his work has changed since coming out West. “I think that the adventure of everyday life here keeps things interesting and that’s why so many people like to call this place home,” Gerald said.

The artist likes hiding things in his compositions so that viewers can look at a piece many times and always find something new. His inspiration is the Teton ecosystem. “There is so much going on, you can walk the same trail every day and it can always look different.”

The show features Gerald’s commercial work, concert and event posters. Framed and unframed editions will be available. With affordable prices, the exhibit is a great way to get the pulse of contemporary Jackson with a historical twist.

Walt Gerald’s “Forward Momentum” opening reception, 7 to 10 p.m. Friday, November 4 at The Rose. pinkgartertheatre.com

Blitz Out

One Percent for the Tetons, the local chapter of One Percent for the Planet, hosts its Video Blitz Friday at the Center for the Arts. The tenth annual video competition matches upcoming filmmakers with local nonprofits funded by One Percent, and lets the audience decide which video wins.

One Percent for the Tetons traces Yvon Chouinard’s One Percent for the Planet blueprint, asking businesses to donate one percent of their profits to grants for conservation and environmental efforts that protect the planet. Chouinard says that one percent can have rippling effects. “I could spend hours here talking about some of the results of those grants, how many dams have come down, how many rivers have been cleaned up … that one percent is one of the best things I’ve ever done,” Chouinard said in a video interview with Chouinard said in a video interview with Jonathan Schechter.

This year the Video Blitz celebrates its past of great grant making, and also looks to the future. Previous winning videos will be featured, including a project to replace lead ammunition with copper bullets, the founding of Vertical Harvest, and the Teton Raptor Center’s Poo-Poo Project.

The current crop of competitors will then premiere the films they’ve been laboring over for the last week.

Films will be judged by all 10 candidates running for local office—town, county and mayor—with the first place film receiving a $1,000 prize. Candidates also each donated a prize for the raffle.

One Percent co-founder Jonathan Schechter explained: “The donation [will allow candidates] to highlight a side of themselves that might not come across in the course of the campaign—it’s a chance to humanize themselves a bit.”

Schechter said the candidates embraced the opportunity, as evidenced in their donations, including a Cajun-Creole dinner by Trey Davis, a living room concert by Judd Grossman, wine tasting with Hailey Morton Levinson and more.

The evening will also give candidates the opportunity to show the community that, win or lose, they are interested in working together to put the community’s interests above their own, Schechter noted. “Yes, judging Video Blitz films is trivial,” he said, “but … as it is happening before the election, it would be a nice foreshadowing to how we can all transcend whatever happened during the campaign to focus on what really matters,” he said.

Finally, One Percent looks to the future. They’ve invited several local eco visionaries—including Chris Agnew of Teton Science Schools, Shawn Hill of VARD, and Kathy Rinaldi of the Greater Yellowstone Coalition—to describe a project they want to successfully address by 2026. Following their presentations, the audience will vote on which vision they find most compelling. Based on that vote, One Percent for the Tetons will award a $6,000 grant to start turning that vision into reality.

One Percent for the Tetons Video Blitz, 7 p.m. Friday, November 4 at the Center, $15. Enjoy free pizza, beer, plus a raffle and silent auction. jhcenterforthearts.org

Pinedale Art Walk

See the vestiges of late fall distilled in Pinedale-born artist Delsa Smith Allen’s new mural installation in her hometown. Deceptively simple, the large-scale photograph of two decaying, fall-colored aspen leaves on a pure white background both heralds the season to come while bidding adieu to Wyoming’s brief autumn. Installed on the exterior of the Rocky Mountain Wash building, “Two Leaves” beckons viewers closer as if there was a secret message to be found in the leaves’ veins. What is found there depends on the viewer’s powers of imagination and metaphor—rivers, canyons, steep drop-offs, bloodlines, seedlings, all might be contained in the aspens’ dropped treasures.

Allen says she is passionate about the Wind River Mountain range and the flora, fauna, and humans who live there.

Join a celebration of the new mural on Saturday, November 5 when Pinedale artists host a local art walk. Meet from 3 to 5 p.m. at Mystery Print Gallery and Frame to view Allen’s work as well as a new show by Casper College sculpture professor Linda Ryan. “Surface/Texture” is an exhibit of Ryan’s latest work, which evokes impressions of skin, tree bark, lava flow, and other compelling derma.

From the contemplative to the playful, journey from Mystery Print over to Isabel Jewelry to see new work by Favian Hernandez. According to gallerist Isabel Rucker, “Hernandez takes the simple materials of paper mache and paint and turns them into something new and beautifully bizarre.” Think pronghorn wearing a straw hat, or a purple jackalope. Hernandez will be travelling from Laramie for the opening reception and his work will hang through the end of December.

The Pinedale Art Walks begins  3 to 5 p.m., Saturday, November 5 at Mystery Print Gallery and Frame. Walk continues 5 to 7 p.m. at Isabel Jewelry and Gallery.

Give Thanks

Penny Lane artists’ cooperative is hosting a “Thanks for Giving” event on Sunday. Shoppers are encouraged to bring canned food and toiletries to donate to the Jackson Cupboard. In exchange, get 15 percent off storewide. Plus, proprietor Andi Keenan will have festive treats and libations for adults and a craft area for kids.

“The mission at Penny Lane Cooperative is to find unique ways in which to give back to our community, provide for those who are in need, and be a place synonymous with loving kindness,” Keenan said. “We hope our doors are flooded with generosity from the people of Jackson for the people of Jackson.”

The clothing store-cum-art gallery just started showing work by Teton Valley artist Steven Glass. Glass recently had a solo show at the Center Theatre Gallery. His work was accepted in the Accessible Art Fair in New York City this fall.

Thanks for Giving event, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday, November 6 at Penny Lane Cooperative. PJH

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About Meg Daly

Meg Daly is a freelance writer and arts instigator. She grew up in Jackson in the 1970s and 80s, when there were fewer fences, but less culture. Follow Meg on Twitter @MegDaly1

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