CULTURE KLASH: Art, Puppies and a Rescued Food Feast

By on August 23, 2016

Events to connect with community, expand the mind and open the heart.

Thursday, August 25: Explorer Artist at Teton Artlab

Top: Informed by adventure, Teton Artlab visiting artist Chad Stayrook is a ‘sci-fi explorer.’ Left: Yappy Hour combines cuddly creatures and booze at the Animal Adoption Center. Right: Penny Wolin makes a stop in her home state as part of her book tour.

Top: Informed by adventure, Teton Artlab visiting artist Chad Stayrook is a ‘sci-fi explorer.’ Left: Yappy Hour combines cuddly creatures and booze at the Animal Adoption Center. Right: Penny Wolin makes a stop in her home state as part of her book tour.

JACKOSN HOLE, WY – Chad Stayrook once canoed from his art studio in Brooklyn up the Hudson River to Peeskill, New York. Upon landing, he planted a flag on the shore. The mayor of Peeskill appeared and declared the day (September 29), “Landing Day.” One year later Stayrook performed a live storytelling of his journey in front of an audience while a map of the journey was tattooed on his arm.

What sort of symbolic experiential adventures Stayrook is up to this month in Jackson will be revealed Thursday at the Teton Artlab. Stayrook is a visiting artist at the Lab through August 31.

Stayrook says he aims for a blend of reality and fantasy in his work. “I leave room for play and spontaneity in all of my work in order to retain a spirit of true exploration.”

His residency coincides with visiting artist Josh Short’s second stint at the Artlab. According to Artlab director Travis Walker, the artists have been getting along like a house on fire.

“We have been sitting outside under the awning of Josh’s Bomb Shelter Radio, talking and listening to vinyl records Josh has collected from all over the country,” Walker said.

“Chad is more sci-fi explorer, while Josh is more punk pirate,” Walker continued. “Their studios resemble a science lab mixed with a kid’s playroom and a natural history museum.”

The open studio is 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday with an artist talk at 6:15 at Teton Artlab. tetonartlab.org.

Friday, August 26: Yappy/Meowy Hour

If you’ve just about had it with hordes of humans, try socializing with other, less opinionated species this week at the Animal Adoption Center.

Adoption counselor Jess Farr says Yappy/Meowy hour is a great time to get to know the animals and chill out after work. Snake River Brewing will donate libations, and Lucky’s Market has donated snacks.

“All of our animals will be here,” Farr said. “If it’s good weather people can hang out in the backyard and we’ll have doggie pools set up. We also send people on mini dog walks. Or you can hang out in Kitty City.”

Farr has also scheduled Meowga yoga classes with cats recently, though the schedule is sporadic. She says the yoga and happy hour are part of a larger outreach effort to get the community more involved.

“We are trying to freshen some things up,” she said. “We are researching what other adoption centers are doing.”

Farr says they are particularly focused on growing their base of foster parents for dogs. “What often happens is that someone fosters a dog for a night and then ends up adopting it. So we have a lot of foster turnover.”

Yappy/Meowy Hour is 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Friday at the Animal Adoption Center. No outside pets, and no unattended children. 739-1881.

Monday, August 29: Shutterbug Shines Light on Diversity

Wyoming native Penny Wolin speaks at the Sublette County Library on Monday as part of her book tour for Descendants of Light: American Photographers of Jewish Ancestry.

A photographer herself, Wolin spent six years traveling the country interviewing 70 notable Jewish photographers, or their families, including Alfred Stieglitz, Annie Leibovitz, Helen Levitt, Diane Arbus, Arnold Newman, Robert Frank, and Richard Avedon.

Wolin’s friend Sue Sommers, a Pinedale artist, helped set up the public appearance.

“Penny grew up in Cheyenne and is extremely loyal to the American West,” Sommers said. “By focusing on her own and others’ Jewish ancestry, Penny offers a view of American culture as a surprising blend of races, religions, and lifestyles.”

Wolin’s work, Sommers added, shows us how the West is a microcosm of our nation and its otherness mashup.

Wolin is also the author of The Jews of Wyoming: Fringe of the Diaspora.  Her photography is in the collections of the Smithsonian Institution, the New York Public Library, the Santa Barbara Art Museum and the Wyoming State Museum.

Penny Wolin speaks 6:30 p.m. Monday in the Lovatt Room of the Sublette County Library in Pinedale.

307-367-4114.

Tuesday, August 30: Feast on Food Waste

Try to imagine the amount of food it would take to feed a family of four for 79 years.

This little sweetie—to be roasted at the Half-a-Million Pounds party for Hole Food Rescue (shh)—was raised on food scraps thanks to HFR.

This little sweetie—to be roasted at the Half-a-Million Pounds party for Hole Food Rescue (shh)—was raised on food scraps thanks to HFR.

That’s how much food Hole Food Rescue has kept out of the landfill in the past three years since its inception. If you think diverting a half million pounds of food from going to waste is cause for celebration, you’re not alone. Hole Food Rescue is throwing a fundraiser soiree at the Center for the Arts on Tuesday and serving a giant rescue food meal for up to 300 people.

Founder/executive director Ali Dunford says the goal of the event is to raise awareness about the work Hole Food Rescue is doing, and how much more there is to be done.

“Food is getting wasted and there are creative things to do with it,” Dunford said. “It doesn’t make sense to throw away good food, especially when there are people in our community who don’t have the resources to afford good perishable food.”

Hole Food Rescue is participating in a research project about food diversion in Teton County. Dunford said that the 15 or 16 venues HFR partners with are only a small fraction of the food venues in the valley.

“There are about 390 businesses registered in Teton County that have food licenses or sell food retail,” Dunford said. “We want to paint a big picture of how much waste is still out there that we could rescue.”

More food rescue will require more resources. Dunford says the organization is currently “bulging at the seams” in terms of its facility. Its lean, two-person staff (Dunford and associate director Jeske Gräve) means there is a limit to just how much food rescue coordination is possible at the moment, even with a cadre of willing volunteers.

“We rescue around 20 thousand pounds of food every month, on average,” Dunford said. “Most of what we get is completely edible and has never even reached the consumer.”

When they have scraps or food that cannot be used, Dunford strives to keep it out of the landfill. “We have three farmers who we give our food scraps to. The Haderlie Farms pig that will be roasted at the celebration was fed on our food scraps.” PJH

The Half-a-Million Pounds Party is 5:30 to 9 p.m. Tuesday at the Center for the Arts. In addition to a pig roast, the celebration includes live music by Bogdog, a silent auction and a raffle, and a Pedal Your Own Smoothie station. No advanced tickets required, just show up with your $10 donation and enjoy. Dunford promises a special surprise around 6:30 p.m. holefoodrescue.org.

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About Meg Daly

Meg Daly is a freelance writer and arts instigator. She grew up in Jackson in the 1970s and 80s, when there were fewer fences, but less culture. Follow Meg on Twitter @MegDaly1

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