FEED ME: World’s best street food is made in Wilson

By on April 7, 2015
Tacos are $4 each or three for $10. Mixing and matching is welcome. (Photo credit: Geraldine Mishev)

StreetFood’s tacos are $4 each or three for $10. Mixing and matching is welcome. (Photo: Geraldine Mishev)

Jackson Hole, Wyoming – Someone has a new favorite restaurant in town. And by “someone,” I of course mean this columnist.

For the last several years, I’ve watched the revolving door of the restaurant at the Stagecoach Bar in Wilson with mild interest. I liked it when that space was an outpost of Pica’s Mexican Taqueria. After Pica’s left, it fell off my radar. Pearl Street Bagels’ Wilson outpost is always delicious and consistent — two things important to me when I’m coming down from skiing Teton Pass and I’m starving.

One Saturday a month ago, just starting to get tired from a round of chemotherapy the day before, worn out from some laps on Mount Oliver that morning, and wanting to make the most of my taste buds while I still had them, I went searching for more than a bagel. My group wandered into the Stagecoach. It was one of the few times I entered a restaurant in this valley without the intent of reviewing it. I didn’t think it would be worth a review.

I love being wrong.

StreetFood hits a high note on most everything important to me: tastiness, variety, service and portion size. The latter is huge. Service is with a smile. The menu includes everything from gyros ($9) to fish and Wagyu beef tacos ($4 each or three for $10), to a baby kale salad with faro, winter vegetables and cranberry Dijon vinaigrette ($9), and a Cuban sandwich ($11).

The Cuban sandwich is stuffed with meat, both roasted pork and ham. (Photo credit: Geraldine Mishev)

The Cuban sandwich is stuffed with meat, both roasted pork and ham. (Photo: Geraldine Mishev)

The lamb burger ($14) is huge and seasoned with all sorts of yumminess including mint, pickled cucumber and herbed aioli. The burger is not huge in a gimmicky way like the burger over at The Brakeman Grill in Teton Valley, though. The Brakeman’s burgers are good, but at an average of 8 inches tall, difficult to actually eat (they sure are fun to marvel at though).  My friend was able to eat his lamb burger while maintaining his dignity and without having all sorts of stuff shoot out the sides of the gluten-free bun (gluten-full buns are available, too).

The only element some people might find StreetFood lacking is in its décor, but heck, it’s inside the Stagecoach Bar. Sitting at its simple tables and chairs, it’s fun to marvel at the fact that the husband-and-wife owners got their start in the valley at the Four Seasons. Even though the décor isn’t fancy, StreetFood is clean. And it offers some fabulous people-watching if you direct your attention into the bar part of the ‘Coach.

Now that the weather is getting nicer, there is also an outdoor patio.

Since that first trip into StreetFood one month ago, I’ve returned two more times, getting something different on each occasion. You know a restaurant is good when you can’t pick a favorite menu item.

But if I were forced to, I would probably admit that it’s the Wagyu beef taco special from my first visit.

Softer than fairy wings, the beef melted in my mouth. The tortillas — doubled up on each taco for structural integrity — were warm and soft, a down sleeping bag for the delicious beef inside them.

A close runner-up would be the fish tacos, heaped high with grilled fish. Or maybe it’s the gyro, which is a holdover from the menu of the restaurant that preceded StreetFood in the space.

Keeping some of the prior restaurant’s most popular menu items — gyros, falafel and the lamb burger — was part of the deal when Amelia Hatchard and Marcos Hernandez purchased the place last year. To that, they’ve added dishes showcasing Hernandez’s heritage — he grew up cooking at his mother’s side in the Mexican state of Guanajuato — and also random international bites like Korean chicken wings, which are at the top of my list of things to try the next time I’m there.

StreetFood at The Stagecoach, 5755 W. Highway 22, 200-6633. Open 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., Tuesdays through Sundays.   

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About Geraldine Mishev

One Comment

  1. dave

    April 22, 2015 at 10:25 am

    you do not mention one important ingredient in the cuban…..no cuban without the pickles!

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