MUSIC BOX: Rock, indie, folk, world-tunes assortment

By on August 13, 2013

JACKSON HOLE, WYO –

Xavier Rudd gets indigenous

Xavier Rudd gets indigenous

1-Man Aussie Band

In addition to being nominated for the “World’s Sexiest Vegetarian Celebrity” award in 2007 (you can’t make this stuff up), Australian native Xavier Rudd brings a lot to the table. In a live setting, he takes a seat behind an assortment of didgeridoos, an Aboriginal stompbox, drums, banjos, harmonicas, bells, bass guitar, laptop slide guitar, and the list goes on. Through his lyrics, Rudd shares ideas and philosophies on the environment, spirituality and humanity, and his world music is a melting pot of folk, reggae, funk and blues. On his 2012 album Spirit Bird, Rudd splices indigenous, pulsing sounds within sprawling song lengths, with occasional musings that are simplified to acoustic guitar and harmonica. If you haven’t been camping yet this summer, this is your escape to the woods.

Portland-based trio Nahko and Medicine for the People open the show with acoustic thump-hop, driven by acoustic guitar and hand drumming.

Xavier Rudd with Nahko and Medicine for the People, 10 p.m. on Friday at Pink Garter Theatre. $27/advance, $30/day-of-show available at Pinky G’s, The Rose and PinkGarterTheatre.com.

 

Black Mother Jones

Black Mother Jones

Black Mother Jones debut

Crunchy power chords, palpable lyrics, and rowdiness are at the helm of Black Mother Jones’s debut LP, Prepared for Nasty Weather. The quartet – Taylor Upton (vocals/guitar/songwriting), Adam Woolley (bass), Leif Routman (guitar/songwriting), Jacob Gampe (drums) – entrusted their fan-funded Kickstarter success of $8,735 to Dusty Nichols-Smoltz (Elk Attack), who engineered the project as the first full-length to be recorded at the Pink Garter Theatre.

Self-described as “electric voodoo boogie,” it would be a reach for this listener to characterize any of the nine tracks as such, with more of a lean towards prog/modern rock and, at times, a voice-affected ’90s alt-rock tinge bringing to mind 311. Regardless of how it’s tagged, this is aggressive rock and roll being written in Jackson rather than recycled, and that’s a niche. Proceeds from the show are going towards the acquisition of a tour van, so get out and show some love.

Black Mother Jones album release, 9 p.m. Saturday at Eleanor’s. $5 or $10/CD included. 733-7901.

Everest in the Commons

Scruffy, riff-tastic rock and roll with dashes of indie-pop have kept L.A.-based Everest propelled towards bigger audiences since forming in 2007. My Morning Jacket comes to mind as double electric guitars back the big vocal presence of frontman/drummer Russell Pollard on the energy-filled LP Ownerless, the band’s first release on ATO Records. Last fall, the band supported Neil Young for a tour during an era that the band describes as “functioning like an eight-armed groove machine,” a vibe cultivated by the band’s newfound sense of being selfless and more collaborative.

Opening the show is local acoustic-soul/folk duo Benyaro, which has appeared in a few different configurations over the last few months. This time around, upright bassist Leif Routman will join frontman/guitarist/percussionist Ben Musser.

Everest with Benyaro, 5 p.m. on Sunday at Concert in the Commons in Teton Village. Free, all-ages. JacksonHole.com.

81413musicbox.sm2Them birds are little

Folk and old-time duo The Littlest Birds feature the unlikely instrument combination of classically trained cello and banjo players David Huebner and Sharon Martinson. In a Reeltime Travelers/Gillian Welch vein. This is porch music with a glass of lemonade by your side. Though from Eastern California, there’s a definite Appalachian backwoods feel, far from the Old Crow Medicine Show rowdiness and instead embracing the delicate touch of traditional folk melodies.

The Littlest Birds, 10 p.m. on Thursday at the Knotty Pine in Victor. Free. 208-787-2866. 


About Aaron Davis

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

35,321 Spambots Blocked by Simple Comments

HTML tags are not allowed.